September 30

From NWS
1961
: A storm system produced rain across much of the state that changed to unseasonably early snow as it tapered off across northwestern and northern Iowa. Sioux City reported 0.4 inches of snow making this the earliest occurrence of measurable snowfall on record at that location. Other reported snowfall amounts included 3.0 inches at Swea City, 2.0 inches at Emmetsburg, and a trace at Council Bluffs, Fort Dodge, Hampton, Harlan, and Mason City. Just to the east across far northeastern Iowa heavy rain fell, with accumulations of 3.37 inches at Elkader and 3.35 inches at Fayette setting all-time September single day rainfall records at those locations.

1939: September started out with record breaking heat as Logan and Glenwood tied the all-time Iowa September record with readings of 107 F on the 6th and 7th, respectively, but ended with a blast of cold air that sent the temperature plummeting to 16 F at Sibley on the 30th which is only one degree above the all-time Iowa September record low. Light snow and sleet even fell at some northern Iowa locations in the last few days of the month, with barely measurable snowfall of one or two tenths of an inch recorded at Sheldon and Sibley.

1899: Unseasonably cold weather settled across Iowa on the last five days of September. On the 26th-28th many locations around the state reported frost with a few stations recording freezes on each day. On the 29th and 30th temperatures fell even further, all the way down to 15 F at Mason City on the 30th which tied the all-time Iowa September record established just the previous day at Sheldon and Sibley. Other low temperatures on the 30th included 16 F at Delaware and Monticello, 17 F at Elkader, Toledo, and West Branch, 18 F at Amana, Independence, and Wilton, and 19 F at Clinton, Guthrie Center, Iowa Falls, and Washington. At Des Moines the low of 26 F remains tied for their coldest September temperature on record.

This Day in National/World Weather History …
 30 September 1971 → Known as the Grande Dame of Hurricanes, Hurricane Ginger was the longest lasting Atlantic hurricane of the 20th Century. She began her 27 day journey east of the Bahamas, went out to the middle of the Atlantic Ocean, then turned around and came back to the west. The storm struck the North Carolina coast on this date, bringing 10 inches of rain and $10 million in damage.
 30 September 1987 → South Bend, IN received a thunder snowstorm.
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Posted under Weather History

This post was written by Schnack on September 30, 2012

September 29

From NWS
1985
: Rain fell across all of Iowa on September 29-30 and into the morning of October 1st across the north. Unseasonably cold temperatures resulted in snow and sleet mixing with the rain at times in some areas, although most of this melted as it fell due to warm ground temperatures. At Des Moines a trace of snow was recorded on both the 29th and 30th, making this one of only two years (along with 1942) that snow has ever been recorded at Des Moines in the month of September. Elsewhere Audubon and Storm Lake each reported a half inch of snow from this system although it melted quickly as precipitation changed back to rain.

1899: Unseasonably cold weather settled across Iowa on the last five days of September. On the 26th-28th many locations around the state reported frost with a few stations recording freezes on each day. On the morning of the 29th temperatures fell even further, all the way down to 15 F at Sheldon and Sibley which established the all-time Iowa September record that would be tied just the next day. Other low temperatures on the 29th included 17 F at Atlantic and Primghar, 18 F at Denison, 19 F at Carroll and Logan, and 20 F at Forest City, Harlan, and Rockwell City.

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Posted under Weather History

This post was written by Schnack on September 29, 2012

Fall Colors #4

If you have photos of fall colors you would like to share…send them to me at  schnack@kwwl.com. Put FALL COLORS in the subject line. I will put all of them on the blog and will use some on the evening newscasts this fall. There is a link at the top of the blog “Fall Colors” that has the latest updates on how the leaves are changing around the Midwest.

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Posted under Fall Colors, Fall Colors 2012, Photo

This post was written by Schnack on September 28, 2012

Weather Hot Shots on Fri. September 28

Submit your weather Hot Shot by clicking here.
One photo is shown on the 5 pm newscast and one on the 10 pm newscast.

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This post was written by Schnack on September 28, 2012

Friday Forecast Updated at 4:00 PM

Tonight:  Clear. Low: 43-46. Wind: Calm.

Saturday: Mostly sunny. High: 75-80. Wind: NW 5-10 mph.

Saturday Night: Clear. Low: 44-47. Wind: N 5 mph.

Sunday: Mostly sunny. High: low 70s.

Monday: Party cloudy. High: mid 70s.

Tuesday: Mostly sunny. High: mid 70s.

Wednesday: Partly cloudy and breezy (SW to NW 10-20 mph). High: mid-upper 70s.

Thursday: Partly cloudy, cooler and breezy (NW 10-20 mph) with a 20% chance of showers. High: mid 60s.

Friday: Mostly sunny. High: mid 60s.

It has been another beautiful fall day and it will continue through the beginning of next week. There are some rain chances by the end of the week. Dry and mild/warm weather will continue through Wednesday. At this point, a cold front will be tracking across the Midwest. Ahead of the front the wind will be gusty from the southwest. Here the forecast position of the front Wednesday morning.


The front is forecast to cross Iowa Wednesday night with a chance of showers. The showers may linger into Thursday. Cooler weather is expected on Thursday behind the front. Highs will be in the mid 60s. The wind will have shifted to the NW at 10-20 mph. The map below is the GFS model for Wednesday night showing the possible rain.


Once the front moves east, high pressure moves back in for Friday with sunshine as high temperatures remain in the mid 60s.

Here is the 8-14 day outlook (Oct 6-12) from the Climate Prediction Center (CPC). Iowa will see below normal temperatures and near normal precipitation.

 

High School Football Forecast (This Evening):

Mostly clear.
Kickoff temp: upper 60s.
Wind: Calm.

College Football Forecast (Saturday)

Minnesota vs. Iowa (Iowa City):
Mostly sunny
Kickoff Temp: low-mid 70s.
Wind: NW 5-10 mph.


North Dakota State vs. UNI (Cedar Falls):
Mostly clear.
Kickoff Temp: mid-upper 70s.
Wind: NW 5 mph.


Texas Tech vs. Iowa State (Ames):
Mostly clear.
Kickoff Temp: mid-upper 70s.
Wind: NW 5 mph.

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Posted under Forecast Discussion, Sports

This post was written by Schnack on September 28, 2012

September 28

From NWS
1986
: Several tornadoes struck Iowa including one that inflicted 2 million dollars damage in northeastern Polk County and Jasper County. This tornado touched down at 5:40 pm near Farrar then moved northeastward to Mingo, Ira, and Baxter destroying 7 homes and 65 farm buildings. Elsewhere large hail and tornadoes producing less major damage were reported in Benton, Clay, Floyd, Tama, and Webster counties. A tornado touched down briefly near Colwell in Floyd County, destroying a farm home and injuring a couple inside.

1953: Unseasonably hot weather brought the temperature all the way up to 103 F at Glenwood making this the latest occurrence of a 100 degree temperature on record in Iowa. Many locations around the state set daily record highs that still stand today, including 91 F at Waterloo and 99 F at Des Moines.

1942: Unseasonably cold weather following a very early snowfall a few days earlier brought temperatures down to record levels across Iowa on the morning of the 28th, with most stations recording their lowest or second-lowest September temperature ever (only behind the incredible cold outbreak of September 29-30, 1899 in some areas). Low temperatures included 18 F at Emmetsburg and Sioux Rapids, 19 F at Cherokee, and 20 F at Decorah, Estherville, Fort Dodge, Marshalltown, Mason City, Oskaloosa, and Webster City. At Des Moines the low of 26 F remains tied for their coldest September temperature on record.

1923: A tornado touched down for only about a mile in southeastern Council Bluffs, killing 6 people and injuring 10 others. A mother and her three children were caught outside in the storm and killed by a falling tree. The storm also produced around a million dollars in flood damage in the Council Bluffs area.

This Day in National/World Weather History …
 28 September 1971 → Atlantic Hurricane Irene crossed Nicaragua to reform in the eastern Pacific as Hurricane Olivia. Olivia recurved northeast and made landfall in central Baja California. The deserts of southern California received an inch of rain.
 28 September 1994 → The auto ferry Estonia capsized and sank quickly in rough waters in the Baltic Sea. It was reported that there were at least 6-foot waves in the area. About 900 people lost their lives, while there were 141 survivors.
 28 September 2004 → The remnants of Hurricane Jeanne, combined with two cold fronts, produced precipitation leading to rising rivers and flooded roads in the northern portion of Delaware, resulting in swamped vehicles. An F2 tornado in northern New Castle County damaged numerous planes and buildings at the airport and injured five people. Damage totaled around $1 million.
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Posted under Weather History

This post was written by Schnack on September 28, 2012

Fall Colors #3

If you have photos of fall colors you would like to share…send them to me at  schnack@kwwl.com. Put FALL COLORS in the subject line. I will put all of them on the blog and will use some on the evening newscasts this fall. There is a link at the top of the blog “Fall Colors” that has the latest updates on how the leaves are changing around the Midwest.

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Posted under Fall Colors, Fall Colors 2012, Photo

This post was written by Schnack on September 27, 2012

Weather Hot Shots on Thu. September 27

Submit your weather Hot Shot by clicking here.
One photo is shown on the 5 pm newscast and one on the 10 pm newscast.

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This post was written by Schnack on September 27, 2012

Thursday Forecast Updated at 4:00 PM

Tonight:  Clear. Low: 39-43. Wind: Calm.

Friday: Mostly sunny. High: 73-76. WInd: S 5 mph.

Friday Night: Clear. Low: 46-49. Wind: Calm.

Saturday: Mostly sunny. High: upper 70s.

Sunday: Mostly sunny. High: low 70s.

Monday: Party cloudy. High: mid 70s.

Tuesday: Mostly sunny. High: mid 70s.

Wednesday: Partly cloudy. High: mid-upper 70s.

Thursday: Partly cloudy and breezy. High: near 70.

It is another beautiful fall day. The sun is shining, the wind is light, the temperatures are comfortable and the leaves are changing. You can’t ask for much more comfortable weather for late September.

High pressure will keep the same conditions through the weekend. High pressure is forecast to be over Iowa on Saturday morning (see map below).


I am tracking a cold front forecast to cross the state Monday with a few clouds and at this point it looks like the front will come through dry. Here is the forecast position of the front Monday morning.


The weather remains the same until Thursday when the next front pushes through. Again this front is forecast to come through dry but it will bring a few clouds, slightly cooler temperatures and some wind. Highs behind the front will be in the upper 60s Thursday. The wind will also be a bit gusty from the northwest (10-20 mph). Here is the forecast position of the front Thursday morning.


The Drought Monitor update was released this morning. There was very little change from last week across Iowa. Extreme drought conditions remain at 66% from last week. The northwest part of Iowa, in the exceptional drought conditions, went from 2% last week to 3% this week.

 

 

High School Football Forecast (Friday Evening):

Mostly clear.
Kickoff temp: upper 60s.
Wind: Calm.

College Football Forecast (Saturday)

Minnesota vs. Iowa (Iowa City):
Mostly sunny
Kickoff Temp: low-mid 70s.
Wind: NW 5-10 mph.


North Dakota State vs. UNI (Cedar Falls):
Mostly clear.
Kickoff Temp: mid-upper 70s.
Wind: NW 5 mph.


Texas Tech vs. Iowa State (Ames):
Mostly clear.
Kickoff Temp: mid-upper 70s.
Wind: NW 5 mph.

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Posted under Drought, Forecast Discussion, Sports

This post was written by Schnack on September 27, 2012

September 27

From NWS
1959
: Severe thunderstorms struck parts of eastern and southeastern Iowa for the second consecutive day. One storm dropped extremely large hail in portions of Scott County with an incredible 7 inch diameter stone reported east of Park View. This is one of the largest hail stones on record in Iowa. The storm also shattered the windows of several homes and businesses in Davenport including at least one greenhouse and a florist where 3000 windows were broken. Another storm produced an F2 tornado that touched down just south of Davenport before crossing into Illinois. Further west the storms produced heavy rain and flooding in some areas, with rainfall amounts ranging up to 3.38 inches at Osceola.

This Day in National/World Weather History …
 27 September 1936 → An early season snowstorm buried Denver, CO. A storm total of 21.3 inches fell at the Denver airport in 60 hours.
 27 September 1985 → Hurricane Gloria passed over North Carolina’s Outer Banks during the morning hours.
 27 September 1987 → Tons of mud and rock were loosened by a week of heavy rain on Sugar Loaf Mountain near Medellin, Colombia. The resulting mudslide killed 183 people.
 27 September 1999 → The Cray C-90 Supercomputer at National Weather Service headquarters was knocked out by an electrical fire. The Supercomputer ran several numerical weather prediction models.
 27 September 2009 → Tropical storm rains dropped a month’s worth of precipitation in 12 hours on Manila, Philippines. It caused the worst flooding in over four decades.
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Posted under Weather History

This post was written by Schnack on September 27, 2012