National Weatherperson’s Day

If you haven’t heard already, February 5th is National Weather Person’s Day.

john_jeffriesThis “holiday” is to commemorate the birth of John Jeffries in 1744.  Jeffries is said to be one of the first people to take weather observations beginning in 1774.  Twice daily, National Weather Service offices across the United States send up a weather balloon with a radiosonde that measure different weather parameters at different layers in the atmosphere.  Jeffries took the first weather balloon observation in 1784.

From the National Weather Service: “National Weatherperson’s Day was created to recognize the men and women who collectively provide Americans with the very best weather, water, and climate forecasts and warning services of any nation in the world.”

All of us with the KWWL Storm Track 7 weather team appreciate you tuning in for your eastern Iowa forecasts each and every day.

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Posted under Miscellaneous, Weather History

This post was written by Kyle Kiel on February 5, 2016

Gulf of Mexico Moisture Source

At this point I don’t need to tell you that this storm has a lot of moisture in it. The moisture source is coming directly from the Gulf of Mexico. The two charts below show different weather parameters showing a very juicy storm. 2

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The chart above is of Precipitable Water (PWAT). The values we are dealing with are more typical during the summer. The chart below shows climatology of PWAT at Davenport. The date is on the bottom and the PWAT values are on the left side. The dot on the right side shows you the value Sunday evening. Yes, it is way higher than normal for this time of year and way above the record for this date.

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The chart below is the Davenport National Weather Service sounding. It shows a saturated atmosphere all the way. Temperature is represented by the red line and the green line is the dew point. When they are close together, like they are in the chart below, the atmosphere is saturated. The bottom of the chart is the surface.

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Posted under Miscellaneous

This post was written by Schnack on December 13, 2015

Relentless Rain in the Northwest

Take a look at this satellite loop from the last seven days. You will see storm after storm after storm pounding the northwest US with heavy rain and snow.

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The map below shows the rain estimate from the last 7 days. Some locations are up over 20″ of rain and the higher elevations are measuring the snow in feet.

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Here is the snow depth as of Wednesday.

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Posted under Miscellaneous

This post was written by Schnack on December 9, 2015

Mudslide in California Last Week

Click in the image below to see some up-close images of the wild mudslide in California last week.

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Posted under Miscellaneous

This post was written by Schnack on October 19, 2015

Tuesday Evening

Here are a few screen captures from our Storm Track 7 Live Weather Network cameras. These were all taken about 20 minutes after sunset as the clouds were slowly clearing.
Weather Bug DBQ TH Hawkeye Comm. College Waterloo Cam Weather Bug TechWorks Temp

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Posted under Miscellaneous

This post was written by Schnack on September 8, 2015

Smoke from Explosion in China

Smoke from an explosion on August 12 at a port in Tianjin, China was seen from the satellite. The black smoke in middle of screen is from the explosion.

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Click here to see the animation of image above.

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Posted under Miscellaneous

This post was written by Schnack on August 13, 2015

Reddish Sun and Moon

During the last week we have seen some unique looking sun and moon photos. The reddish color to the sun and moon are due to the wild fires in Canada. The image below shows where some of the fires are and their related smoke from June 28.

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The below information is from Canadian Wildland Fire Information System:

Over the past 5 days fire activity has increased dramatically, with 758 new fires and 381,690 ha of area burned. The majority of the new fires have occurred in British Columbia, Alberta, and Saskatchewan (14%, 29%, and 15% respectively), while the majority of the area burned was in Yukon, Saskatchewan and Parks Canada (14%, 40%, and 16% respectively). Seasonal fire occurrence and area burned are both well above the 10-year average.

Fire danger increased to very high throughout western and northern Canada, while central and eastern Canada remained at moderate or low fire danger. Fire danger in British Columbia is very high. Northern Alberta has very high to extreme fire danger while southern regions are at moderate to low. Fire danger in the Northwest Territories and Saskatchewan is high to extreme. Manitoba and western Ontario are showing moderate fire danger. Fire danger from eastern Ontario to Atlantic Canada is low to moderate.

Here is a photo from Tuesday as the sun was setting in eastern Iowa.

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(Photo: Al Sundt)

Here is another photo from Rochester, MN Thursday evening as the sun was setting.
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(Photo: KTTC-TV Chief Meteorologist Randy Brock)

The images below show the set up today with a northwest flow aloft taking the smoke from Canada southeast in the upper levels of the atmosphere across the middle of the country.
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We might continue to see the reddish sun and moon for the next couple of days while the northwest flow remains in place and as long as the fires keep burning.

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Posted under Miscellaneous

This post was written by Schnack on July 2, 2015

50s in Perspective

Mar 6 50 Deg

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Posted under Miscellaneous

This post was written by Schnack on March 6, 2015

Winter Begins This Afternoon

The Winter Solstice begins at 5:03 PM and is it known as the shortest day of the year. It is, but not just today. Due to our latitude, the length of daylight is the this short through the 25th. December 26th the days start getting longer.

Dec 21 Daylight

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Posted under Miscellaneous

This post was written by Schnack on December 21, 2014

Old Storm Prediction Center Products Being Retransmitted

We are aware of the problem with old tornado and severe thunderstorm watches being sent out this morning by the Storm Prediction Center. The automated service we use to retransmit that information sent the OLD watch out on Twitter and Facebook this morning.  There are NO watches in effect for eastern Iowa.

 

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Posted under Miscellaneous

This post was written by Schnack on November 12, 2014