“Matthew” and “Otto” Retired as Hurricane Names

Hurricane Matthew

The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) will retire the names “Matthew” and “Otto” for Atlantic tropical systems, meaning they will no longer be assigned to future storms. These will be the 81st and 82nd names retired for the Atlantic basin. This happens when the tropical cyclone was very deadly or causes a devastating amount of damage during its lifespan.

Matthew will be replaced with the name “Martin” and Otto will be replaced with the name “Owen”. These changes will occur in 2022, when the 2016 list of names is reused. There are 6 lists of names, one list for one year. One list is repeated every seven years. For more information on Atlantic tropical system naming, click here.

For more information on Matthew and Otto being retired, click here.

Matthew forecasts and advisories.

Otto forecasts and advisories.

For other tropical cyclones in the Atlantic that have been retired, click here.

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Posted under NOAA, Weather History, Weather Trivia

This post was written by Rachael Peart on March 27, 2017

13 Tornadoes Monday Evening

 

The above tornado records are from 1980-2015.

 

 

Muscatine
RATING: EF-2
ESTIMATED PEAK WIND: 115 MPH
PATH LENGTH: 1.8 MILES
PATH WIDTH /MAXIMUM: 200 YARDS
FATALITIES: 0
INJURIES: 3

 

Seymour
RATING: EF-2
ESTIMATED PEAK WIND: 115-125 MPH
PATH LENGTH: 12.6 MILES
PATH WIDTH /MAXIMUM: 200 YARDS
FATALITIES: 0
INJURIES: 3

 

South of Harcourt
RATING: EF-0
ESTIMATED PEAK WIND: 70 MPH
PATH LENGTH: 2.3 MILES
PATH WIDTH /MAXIMUM/: 30 YARDS
FATALITIES: 0
INJURIES: 0

 

North of Dayton
RATING: EF-0
ESTIMATED PEAK WIND: 70 MPH
PATH LENGTH: 1.4 MILES
PATH WIDTH /MAXIMUM/: 30 YARDS
FATALITIES: 0
INJURIES: 0

 

West of Knoxville
RATING: EF-1
ESTIMATED PEAK WIND: 90 to 100 MPH
PATH LENGTH: 0.9 MILES
PATH WIDTH /MAXIMUM/: 100 YARDS
FATALITIES: 0
INJURIES: 0

 

North of Knoxville
RATING: EF-1
ESTIMATED PEAK WIND: 85 to 95 MPH
PATH LENGTH: 1.5 MILES
PATH WIDTH /MAXIMUM/: 80 YARDS
FATALITIES: 0
INJURIES: 0

 

Centerville
RATING: EF-2
ESTIMATED PEAK WIND: 115-125 MPH
PATH LENGTH: 8.1 MILES
PATH WIDTH /MAXIMUM/: 200 YARDS
FATALITIES: 0
INJURIES: 0

 

Blue Grass/NW Davenport/Eldridge Iowa…
RATING: EF-2
ESTIMATED PEAK WIND: 120 MPH
PATH LENGTH: 25.3 MILES
PATH WIDTH /MAXIMUM/: 1,000 YARDS
FATALITIES: 0
INJURIES: 0

 

Bernard
RATING: EF-0
ESTIMATED PEAK WIND: 95 MPH
PATH LENGTH: 5.7 MILES
PATH WIDTH /MAXIMUM/: 25 YARDS
FATALITIES: 0
INJURIES: 0

 

Bennett
RATING: EF-1
ESTIMATED PEAK WIND: 110 MPH
PATH LENGTH: 16.8 MILES
PATH WIDTH /MAXIMUM/: 100 YARDS
FATALITIES: 0
INJURIES: 0

 

Low Moor
RATING: EF-1
ESTIMATED PEAK WIND: 110 MPH
PATH LENGTH: 4.36 MILES
PATH WIDTH /MAXIMUM/: 50 YARDS
FATALITIES: 0
INJURIES: 0

 

Walcott
RATING: EF-2
ESTIMATED PEAK WIND: 115 MPH
PATH LENGTH: 34.7 MILES
PATH WIDTH /MAXIMUM/: 200 YARDS
FATALITIES: 0
INJURIES: 0

 

Grandview
RATING: EF-2
ESTIMATED PEAK WIND: 115 MPH
PATH LENGTH: 0.3 MILES
PATH WIDTH /MAXIMUM/: 150 YARDS
FATALITIES: 0
INJURIES: 0

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Posted under NOAA, Severe Weather

This post was written by Schnack on March 7, 2017

Spotter Training Schedule

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Posted under NOAA, Severe Weather

This post was written by Schnack on February 21, 2017

New GOES-16

The new GOES-R has become GOES-16. The first images from the new satellite have been released by NOAA/NASA today. Here is a side-by-side comparison of 16 vs 13. Here is the press release.

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If you want to see a very detailed look at the above photo click here.

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Posted under NASA, NOAA, Photo

This post was written by Schnack on January 23, 2017

There’s a New Satellite in Town

Actually, in space.  GOES-16 was launched in November and just sent back the first images. And they are stunning!

Goes 16 full res image

GOES stands for Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite.   GOES-16 is the first of four new satellites from NASA that will replace the aging satellites currently in orbit. The new satellites can multitask… taking full disc images, like the one above, every 15 minutes, and a full U.S. image every 5 minutes, along with pinpointing regional areas that may be experiencing drought, hurricanes, volcanic eruptions….  It won’t actually be operational until later this year, but it is already impressing a lot of scientists!

To read more about the satellite, click here.

To see more of the fantastic first images, click here.

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Posted under NASA, NOAA

This post was written by Eileen Loan on January 23, 2017

NOAA Weather Radio is Off Air

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Posted under NOAA

This post was written by Schnack on January 4, 2017

Why Long-Range Snow Forecasts are Wrong

In the past 7-10 days I have been asked about a major winter storm in the middle of next week. The problem with that is when all of this started it was about 10-14 days before the “storm”. Here is another way a looking at long-range snow forecasts. Any details you read about or share are most likely going to be wrong. My best advise is not to share that kind of information 10-14 days out.

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Posted under Long Range Outlook, NOAA, Winter Weather

This post was written by Schnack on December 2, 2016

ICYMI Nov 23 – Fogbow/ AERI/

Meteorologist are always looking for was to improve weather forecasting. An instrument called,  Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer, or AERI might help. The data it gathers might improve forecast models. Click here to read more information.

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Fogbow in Scotland
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Click here to see how fogbows form.


 

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Posted under Clouds, NOAA

This post was written by Schnack on November 23, 2016

New Weather Satellite Launches

Saturday, November 19th marked a big day in the meteorological and space world.  A rocket carrying a new weather satellite, called “GOES-R” (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite), launched from Cape Canaveral, Florida at 5:42 PM (CST).

goes r

This new satellite will be stationed 22,300 miles above Earth’s surface, and help provide improvements in detection and observation of weather here on Earth.  The new satellite will provide advanced imaging across the Western Hemisphere, improved lightning data, as well as monitoring space weather.

Once in operation, the satellite will be called GOES-16.

 

The new instruments within the satellite will give us more data and imagery faster than ever before (approximately every 30 seconds).  Read more about the GOES-R satellite here.

 

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Posted under Astronomy, NASA, NOAA

This post was written by Kyle Kiel on November 19, 2016

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ICYMI Nov 14 – No Snow/ Warm Temperatures/

As of November 14, only 0.2% of US has snow. In the last 14 years it is the lowest percentage on this day.

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From NOAA: The map on the left shows average snow cover from 1981 to 2010 for the second week of November. (Data: NCEI) The image on the right shows the current amount of snow cover as of November 14, 2016. (Data: National Ice Center)

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Here is a look at above normal average temperatures for a good part of North America today. Take a look at the colder than normal conditions on the other side of the globe. There is some cold air, but just not nearby.

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Posted under NOAA, Temperatures, Winter Weather

This post was written by Schnack on November 15, 2016