Author Archive: Chris Larimer

Chris Larimer is an Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Northern Iowa.

In addition to serving as the political analyst for KWWL News, Chris is a past president of the Iowa Association of Political Scientists, as well as a regular guest on Iowa Public Radio.

His research focuses on the psychology of voting, political behavior, and Iowa politics. Most recently Chris is the author of "Gubernatorial Stability in Iowa." He is also the co-author of "The Public Policy Theory Primer" and "The Public Administration Theory Primer", and has authored or co-authored several articles that have appeared in political science journals.

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Reflecting on the 2019 legislative session

May 6, 2019 0 Comments

Much has already been written about the specific bills that were passed in the 2019 Iowa legislation session, so I want to focus instead on three more general observations. 1.)        The saying of “elections have consequences” holds true.  Because Iowa Republicans have majority control in the statehouse, they were able to push through a very […]

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Why 99, not 40, is the more important number for Senator Ernst

May 5, 2019 0 Comments

As James Lynch reported on Friday, the latest approval rating for U.S. Senator Joni Ernst (40%) does not mean her reelection chances are sunk for 2020.  In fact, as I communicated to James, based on my own research of other Iowa incumbents (governors), a sub-50 approval rating is nowhere near a guarantee of defeat at […]

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Unelectable electables

May 2, 2019 0 Comments

Today’s column from The Crystal Ball newsletter (found here) is a good reminder of the limits of political forecasting.  As Kyle Kondik documents, while those who follow electoral politics are fascinated by the concept of “electability, the truth is that voters, pundits, and political operatives struggle to define the concept until after it happens (i.e. […]

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A message in defense of voters

April 24, 2019 0 Comments

Dear pollsters: Before you spend too much time wondering what Iowa voters think of the 19 Democratic candidates running for president, consider the following passage from the book, Democracy for Realists, by Christopher Achen and Larry Bartels: “The folk theory of democracy celebrates the wisdom of popular judgments by informed and engaged citizens. The reality […]

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Reacting to the Mueller report

April 18, 2019 0 Comments

Putting aside Congressman Massie’s peculiar question, “How do you get a bachelor of arts in a science,” can we please stop pretending that political science isn’t useful for understanding politics today? Yes, the Mueller report was released today.  But let’s put this in perspective. Voters are rarely persuadable, voters tend to engage in motivated reasoning, […]

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Iowa will remain a good place to study politics in 2020

April 15, 2019 0 Comments

Congressman Dave Loebsack’s announcement that he will retire at the end of his current term in 2021 adds another layer of competitiveness to the 2020 elections in Iowa. As my colleague, Donna Hoffman, and I have argued at length, the recent electoral history and demographics of the state continue to make Iowa a “swing state” […]

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Spring time approval, summer time gridlock

March 28, 2019 0 Comments

Approval of Congress is at 26%! That may not seem like something to write home about, but it is the second highest approval rating since November of 2009 (approval reached 28 percent in February of 2017).  In fact, congressional approval has exceeded 19 percent in each of the first three months of the year, which […]

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Mueller and eggs

March 26, 2019 0 Comments

For some people, the Mueller report is the end of the story, for others, it is only just the beginning.  But as has been discussed in this blog and elsewhere, voters, particularly strong partisans, are subject to confirmation bias in how they interpret and process political information—we cling to things that fit with our preexisting […]

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Special election recap

March 20, 2019 0 Comments

The special election for Senate District 30, or what I called the “S-cubed” election, is over.  The Democrat, Eric Giddens, received 57 percent of the vote, compared to 42 percent for Republican challenger, Walt Rogers.  Below are a couple of parting observations: First, turnout in this election far exceeded that of five previous special elections […]

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The upcoming “S-cubed” election

March 11, 2019 0 Comments

The special election to fill State Senate District 30 left vacant by Jeff Danielson’s resignation is just over a week away.  Satellite voting in Maucker Union on the UNI campus will be held from 10:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m. on Tuesday and Wednesday of this week. As with any election, turnout will be key, but perhaps […]

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